Articles Tagged with IVF

Shttps://www.indianafamilylawyerblog.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/285/2017/07/pinterest-icon-logo-D4965B6748-seeklogo.com_.pngocial media site, Pinterest, recently added adoption and surrogacy benefits for its 500 employees. Pinterest’s employees will be eligible to receive up to $5,000 in adoption reimbursement and up to $20,000 for surrogacy benefits. Pinterest already provides 16 weeks of paid parental leave, as well as up to $20,000 in fertility benefits. Pinterest head of diversity and inclusion, Candice Morgan, stated, “Our [team] often speaks with employees to learn more about how we should expand our benefits, and we recently spoke with a colleague who’s been considering surrogacy with his husband.”

Pinterest is not the only company that provides fertility and adoption benefits. American Express offers five months of paid leave across genders, along with $35,000 to assist with adoption and surrogacy. Ernst & Young offers up to $25,000 for same-sex and heterosexual couples to cover adoption, surrogacy, and egg freezing services. Johnson & Johnson has also increased its benefits for surrogacy, adoption, and fertility services. As adoption, fertility treatment, and surrogacy become more common forms of family-building, companies will need to follow the lead of those mentioned in this blog post and expand the scope of their benefits to meet the needs of their employees.

The attorneys of Harden Jackson Law are devoted to servicing clients in all areas of family law, including divorce, custody, child support, property division, paternity, post-divorce modifications, prenuptial and postnuptial agreements, simple wills, adoption, surrogacy, and other areas of reproductive law. For more information, please contact us at 317.569.0770 or www.hardenjacksonlaw.com.

Infertility.jpgOne in eight couples experiences infertility in the United States. While infertility awareness is growing, people facing infertility may encounter insensitive and hurtful comments (though not always intentional). A brief refresher on infertility etiquette is a helpful way to minimize these uncomfortable experiences. Read on for some Dos and Don’ts when talking to friends and loved ones experiencing infertility.


Do

Listen. Show them that you care by listening to them if they choose to open up about their infertility struggle. Lend an ear and remain attentive as they share their experience with you.

fortune.jpgAn important issue surrounding frozen embryos has recently emerged into spotlight: What happens when parents die and leave no will or instructions for the fertility clinic regarding the disposition of their frozen embryos? A Master in Chancery appointed by a Dallas probate court has recommended that a two year old boy, whose parents were murdered, inherit their eleven frozen embryos when he turns eighteen. John Robertson, professor of law at the University of Texas at Austin, addresses the groundbreaking nature of this case in the Harvard Law Petrie-Flom Center Blog by stating that “there are no Texas or United States cases involving inheritance of frozen embryos when both parties have died and left no instructions with the clinic or in a will.”

This issue introduces the question of whether frozen embryos are considered “property” in these types of scenarios. Robertson informs us that the Master found that Texas courts have not held them to be property, nor have they found them to be worthless. He reports that as a result, the Master assigned them an implicit value under Texas’s intestacy statute since they can be the subject of an enforceable contract. If they embryos are not designated as “property,” the Master found that the boy can still retain an “ownership interest” that would give him “dispositional control” over the eleven embryos.

Robertson introduces the complex issues that arise from giving a two year old orphan dispositional control over his future siblings when he turns eighteen, including the “oddity” of asking someone so young to “decide whether to continue paying storage fees, discard [the embryos], or donate to others or to research.”