Articles Tagged with “gestational surrogacy”

616726_handshake.jpgSurrogacy laws vary by state. Indiana law currently holds that all surrogacy contracts are void and unenforceable. However, Indiana law does not prohibit the act of surrogacy itself, and recent court rulings have been favorable to surrogacy. Indiana has strong case law on the establishment of parentage in the biological parents of a child born through gestational surrogacy (In re Paternity and Maternity of Infant R., 922 N.E.2d 59 (Ind. Ct. App. 2010)). Despite Indiana’s antiquated statute, surrogacy agreements are still completed in Indiana for the following reasons:

1. Experienced assisted reproductive professionals require surrogacy agreements. Most physicians and fertility clinics do not permit parties to enter into a surrogacy arrangement without a contract. Mental health specialists and reproductive law attorneys often have a similar requirement.

2. Surrogacy agreements delineate the parties’ expectations, liabilities, and responsibilities. Surrogacy contracts provide stability by ensuring that everyone is on the same page. These agreements contain carefully drafted provisions that address every aspect of the surrogacy, from confidentiality to the payment schedule. They also foster accountability among the parties. Additionally, surrogacy contracts diminish the potential for disputes, as parties can refer to the agreement for guidance in the event of an uncertainty.

bond_with_baby_during_pregnancy.jpgHave you ever wondered what the difference is between gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy? The surrogate’s genetic contribution is the distinguishing factor between the two classifications. In traditional surrogacy arrangements, the surrogate contributes her egg and is therefore genetically related to the child she is carrying. The intended father supplies the sperm. In contrast, the surrogate has no genetic link to the child in a gestational surrogacy arrangement.

Gestational surrogacy is the newer of the two categories and was first reported in 1985. Gestational surrogacy involves the surrogate mother carrying an embryo created from the genetic material of one or both of the intended parents. If an intended parent is unable to supply their genetic material, they will utilize donor egg or sperm. Gestational surrogacy is considered legally safer than traditional surrogacy, because the child has no biological relation to the gestational surrogate. Gestational surrogacy also poses fewer hurdles to the establishment of legal parentage due to the biological connection between the intended parents and the child.

The shift from traditional surrogacy towards gestational surrogacy was propelled by the Baby M case decided by the New Jersey Supreme Court in 1986, where two families “f[ought] over a baby who belonged to both of them.” In Baby M., the surrogate refused to return the child, born through traditional surrogacy, to the biological father and his wife. The embryo was created using the biological father’s sperm and the surrogate’s egg. The intended parents sued to relinquish the surrogate’s parental rights and sought to establish legal parentage in the biological father’s wife. However, the New Jersey court ruled that the surrogate was the child’s legal mother. The use of traditional surrogacy declined following the outcome of Baby M. Courts’ inclination to establish legal parentage due to the genetic link and the accessibility of reproductive technology popularized gestational surrogacy.

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