Why Estate Planning is Essential for Surrogacy

baby hand.jpgWhile a family building journey brings much excitement, it’s also important to address the difficult but necessary subject of estate planning. Estate planning documents can prevent the additional stress and disorientation should tragedy afflict the intended parents or the gestational surrogate.

It is highly recommended that the intended parents establish or amend their existing estate planning documents to reflect the child that the gestational surrogate is gestating. This should involve designating a guardian for the child, unequivocally stating the child’s legal parentage, and establishing financial support for the child in the event of the intended parents’ death. Additionally, if the intended parens have stored cryopreserved embryos or other genetic material, their disposition should be addressed in the estate planning documents (absent a separate disposition agreement).

The gestational surrogate should also establish or amend her existing estate planning documents to reflect the child. This typically involves stating that the child is not biologically related to her and does not inherit from her, and designating the intended parents as guardians of the child in the event of her death. It’s also important for the gestational surrogate to execute a document (such as a power of attorney) expressing her desires regarding life support and selecting a designee to carry out her wishes should she become incapacitated during the pregnancy.

Note that surrogacy agreements generally do not carry sufficient legal authority for estate planning purposes. Therefore, intended parent(s) and gestational surrogates should consult with an experienced attorney to draft (or amend) estate planning documents for their assisted reproductive technology needs.

The attorneys of Harden Jackson Law are devoted to servicing clients throughout the Indianapolis area and the state of Indiana in all areas of family law, including divorce, custody, child support, property division, paternity, post-divorce modifications, prenuptial and postnuptial agreements, simple wills, adoption, surrogacy and other areas of assisted reproductive technology law. For more information, please contact us at 317.569.0770 or www.hardenjacksonlaw.com.

Remember, these blog posts are not meant to be legal advice. You should consult an attorney to discuss the specifics of your situation.

photo credit: Khloe via photopin (license)